Singapore Sling

Singapore Sling

The iconic Singapore Sling was invented at the famed Raffles Hotel in Singapore around 1915, and the Long Bar there still seems to be cranking them out over 100 years later. Reportedly one of Hunter S. Thompson’s favorite cocktails, the Singapore Sling doesn’t get much play in many bars, and it’s easy to see why: It can be quite bitter and unbalanced and needs a bit of doctoring to liven things up.

To that end, here’s our rendition of the Sling, one which uses more pineapple juice and sweetens things up a bit to give it more of a tropical flair while keeping the drink’s iconic herbal ingredients — including Benedictine — well-represented. Some Sling versions also include soda, which is more of a matter of personal taste. 

How to Make Singapore Sling In some versions of this recipe, sugar is omitted entirely and the mixture is made entirely with liqueurs. If you find that this changes the taste of your Singapore sling, consider using sugar substitutes. Rum is also sometimes added to the mix in order to balance the sweetness of the liqueurs. This version of the recipe has become very popular and is easily available, although the prices can be high due to the increased demand.

Drinkhacker’s Singapore Sling
3 oz pineapple juice
1.5 oz gin
.5 oz cherry liqueur (we used Cerasum in lieu of the usually specified Cherry Heering)
.5 oz grenadine
.25 oz simple syrup
.25 oz triple sec
.25 oz Benedictine
.25 oz lime juice
dash Angostura bitters

Singapore Sling

Shake all ingredients and strain into a Collins or hurricane glass with fresh ice. Garnish with a cherry and a slice of pineapple.